By the title of this blog, you might be wondering how the words ‘snorkels’ and ‘Osteopaths’ would ever come up in the same sentence. But having worked as an Osteopath for more than 25 years, Robin Kiashek is no stranger to looking at the bigger picture. Especially when it comes to the topic of health.

At Robin’s London clinics, one appointment could be spent tending to a patient’s chronic back pain. While the next session could see him help long Covid patients by using the Perrin Technique™.

“When you’re an osteopath, every day is different,” Robin says. “And no day is the same.”

One case which shows the breadth and depth of an Osteopath’s skills was the case of Patient X – who reported a 40% improvement just one week after visiting Robin in his clinic.

 

The problem

Patient X was referred to Robin by a neurologist, after presenting with intermittent nausea and feelings of constant imbalance. The patient also experienced daily headaches.

 

The medical history

Along with a history of chronic lower back pain, Patient X has a history of tinnitus – the name given to the horrible ringing sensation that can be heard in one both of your ears.

Over the course of years, there was a history of imbalance which would last several minutes when open water swimming. So much so, Patient X would have to lift their head out of the water frequently to see where they were going.

“It would take a day for the patient to recover from the general sense of unwellness and dizziness,” Robin recalls.

 

The diagnosis?

Robin says: “I believe that Patient X’s imbalance resulted from sub-occipital vertebral artery compression, which can be exacerbated by cervical extension – as noted with open water swimming.

“The irritation of these nerves during cervical extension, can cause the diaphragm to contract,” Robin explains. “As the stomach sits superior to the diaphragm, any contraction of the diaphragm will cause undue pressure on the stomach, resulting in a sense of nausea.”

 

The treatment?

Robin focused on releasing Patient X’s mid thoracic misalignment, where cervical active movements emanate from, using gentle osteopathic technique.

He also avoided direct treatment to the patient’s neck, and instead used medical acupuncture to the trapezii region and to the right pelvic imbalance.

Robin also suggested that Patient X uses a snorkel and mask when swimming, to avoid cervical extension, and invest in a new pillow.

 

The progress speaks for itself

Just one week later, Patient X reported a general 40% subjective improvement.

“Patient X’s imbalance was no longer constant,” Robin says. “The patient also only experienced one headache. After buying a snorkel, mask and a new pillow – Patient X was left feeling a good deal better.”

 

If you are suffering with any kind of health problem, whether it’s headaches, stomach pains, or mobility issues, don’t hesitate to call Robin or book in for an initial consultation.

Lower back pain really is exactly that – a massive pain in the back. Worldwide, the condition is believed to affect 540 million people. While in the UK, the debilitating problem affects around one-third of the adult population each year.

 

It can be caused by a range of wide and varied reasons. The pain might come on because you have suffered a strain or sprain. It could also be caused by bad posture or a sedentary lifestyle. But even stress can be another factor adding to the pain in your lower back as it can manifest physically as tightened muscles and thus add to the ache you are suffering.

 

So, when should you be worried about lower back pain?

Your spine is made of solid bony blocks reinforced by strong ligaments. It has a total of 40 muscles, with 20 muscle pairs on each side of your body. It is surprisingly difficult to damage. However, if lower back pain does occur, and it is accompanied by other symptoms, it’s worth a prompt trip to your GP.

The secondary symptoms to watch out for include:

  • A high temperature
  • Bladder problems
  • Weight loss

Keep calm and get it checked

If you are suffering with these added symptoms, it’s never too soon to get your back checked. However, it’s important that you try not to worry.

 

Lower back pain is rarely caused by anything serious. And as the NHS confirms, worrying will do you no good, as people who manage to stay positive despite their pain tend to recover quicker.

 

How osteopathy can help lower back pain

If you are suffering from back problems, osteopathic treatment can help with the improvement of physiological function. It can do this through the use of soft tissue stretching, joint manipulation and the likes of resisted isometric ‘muscle energy’ stretching. And there’s research to prove it.

 

A recent 2021 meta-analysis, which was published in the Complementary Therapies in Medicine, saw researchers look into the effectiveness of osteopathic interventions in chronic non-specific low back pain. In the analysis, researchers conclude that: “Osteopathy is effective in pain levels and functional status improvements in non-specific chronic low back pain patients.”

 

Let’s get you back on the road to recovery

Robin Kiashek has been practicing Osteopathy for more than 25 years. In that time, he has trained in various additional complementary disciplines to extend the options he can offer his patients – including those suffering with lower back pain. These include:

  • Western Medical Acupuncture – this is an effective form of pain relief because as confirmed by this study*, acupuncture can enhance peripheral blood flow which helps to heal wounds faster.
  • Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) – this has long been used in the field of osteopathy and is widely available for the treatment of pain, the healing of wounds and musculoskeletal conditions – like low back pain. It provides a highly effective needle-free acupuncture medium as it uses low power laser light to alter cellular function, improve outcomes and speed up your body’s natural healing process.

 

The moral of the (lower back pain) story

If in doubt, check it out. Get in touch with your GP or speak to Robin who could help you get to the root cause of the issue.

 

Robin works in a holistic manner so will take a full medical and lifestyle history to get a proper understanding of the issue that brought you to his clinic.

 

This, combined with a physical examination enables him to devise a treatment plan tailored to you.

 

*Reference:
Yang, Cheng-Chan, Wei-You Zhuang, and Hsien-Tsai Wu. “Assessment of the impact of acupuncture on peripheral blood flow with multi-channel photoplethysmography.” In Electron Devices and Solid-State Circuits (EDSSC), 2014 IEEE International Conference on, pp. 1-2. IEEE, 2014.

 

Pain Management

When in pain, most people tend to apply heat to the problem area rather than cold/ice compressions. Which is understandable – it feels more soothing.  And who wants to add being cold and uncomfortable to an already painful situation?

“In my 25 years of practicing osteopathy, I’ve only ever encountered one patient treating their pain by applying ice,” Osteopath Robin Kiashek tells us.

But actually, a hit of cold/ice therapy might be a better solution.

What is cold/ice therapy?

Cold water therapy is the practice of using water that’s around 15 degrees to treat health conditions or stimulate health benefits.  While ice therapy is the practice of using ice to do the exact same.

Despite the current buzz around this type of therapy – with the rise of the cold shower trend – this type of treatment has actually been used for thousands of years.

How does cold/ice therapy work?

Cold therapy, or in this case – ice therapy, is sometimes referred to as cold hydrotherapy or cryotherapy.  And it has the power to reduce inflammation in our body.

So, when we are hurt or are in pain, whether it’s through stubbing our toe, spraining our ankle or something more serious – ice therapy slows blood flow to the area by causing vasodilation of blood capillaries.  This expels blood from the surrounding area temporarily. Once the ice (wrapped in a wet tea towel) is removed after five minutes, fresh blood enters the injured area.

This in turn reduces inflammation and swelling that causes pain in the joint or tendon.

It is particularly effective for acute injuries and also if it is put into practice quickly after the injury occurs.

How does cold therapy compare to heat therapy?

Conversely, heat therapy causes blood vessels to dilate by arterial vasodilation which rushes blood flow to the area.  It can feel very soothing.

And heat therapy can definitely help with flexibility issues, tight muscles and damaged tissues. But it’s not a good idea where there is swelling.

The power of cold therapy

Robin saw the power of cold therapy first-hand when his son underwent surgery after tearing his anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). As part of the recovery process, he was given a Game Ready machine that pumps iced water every 30 minutes, for 30 minutes, around the injured knee.

Robin says: “Rest, ice, compression and elevation (RICE) have long been used to treat acute injury and to help the recovery and rehabilitation process after surgery. It’s something I tell my patients when they come to me in pain.”

But cold/ice therapy can be used for other holistic and physical outcomes.

What are the benefits of cold/ice therapy?

We’ve spoken before about the benefits of cold/ice therapy. But according to the science, cold/ice therapy can:

  • Give your immune system a boost.  A range of studies have proven that doses of cold therapy could bolster your immune system over a period of weeks or months.
  • Ease symptoms of depression.  Research has shown that cold open water swimming could help those suffering with anxiety and depression.
  • Help with muscle soreness.  In a 2011 study, cyclists who were immersed in cold water for 10 minutes had decreased soreness. And a later 2016 study reported the same results.

However, before you plunge yourself in an outdoor lake or ice bath, it’s important to discuss any sudden cold-water immersions with your doctor.  Just to make sure it’s safe for to do so.

Plus, you must never apply ice directly to the skin as it will burn and it should only be used under medical guidance.

If you’re in pain, don’t hesitate to get in touch with Robin.
Robin Kiashek treats patients suffering from all types of conditions.  Including sporting injuries, musculoskeletal issues and headaches.

Research published by Macmillan Cancer Support shows an estimated 7 million people across the country turned to running or jogging during the Covid-19 crisis to boost their mental health.

One in seven people in the UK (14%) said running had helped them deal with stress since the first lockdown in March.  And about a third said running helped them feel calmer and more positive.

All of which is great news.  But it’s important that these mental benefits don’t come at a physical cost. More research (!) show that, for every 1,000 hours of running, beginners get injured twice as often as experienced runners.

Among the most common problems to plague runners are Plantar Fasciitis – painful inflammation of the tissue along the bottom of the foot and Achilles Tendonitis. This manifests as pain and tenderness in the heel and along the Achilles tendon.  Which is the thickest tendon in the human body.

Responding to running injury

On a practical level, there are a couple of simple self-help measures that you can try:

  • First and foremost, take an immediate break from training.
  • Apply ice regularly to the painful area for the first 48-72 hours to reduce swelling.
  • Take a good look at your training footwear. Running shoes will generally need replacing after you’ve run 300-500 miles.
  • Consider gentle, stretching exercises, such as the heel drop (devised by Swedish sports doctor Dr Hakan Alfredson).  Try three sets of 15 heel drops twice daily over three months.

Give low-level laser therapy a try

Over time, most such treatments will provide some relief.  But what if you had access to a quicker, more effective and long-lasting therapy? Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) could be the answer. It’s a pain-free, non-invasive treatment that involves placing a low-power light beam on the injured area. The light stimulates repair by cellular organelles (specialised structures within a cell that carry out a particular function) called Mitochondria, This reduces pain and promotes a speedier, safer recovery.

Treatment times are relatively short and many patients report encouraging results within two or three sessions.

LLLT is used widely by osteopaths in the United States.  It is gaining ground here in the UK, alongside general osteopathic techniques, as a successful treatment for sports injuries.  Also, Plantar Fasciitis, Achilles Tendonitis, back pain, various types of arthritis and other conditions including strains and sprains.

Osteopath Robin Kiashek said: “I’ve been using LLLT as part of my treatment plans for over 10 years.  It sits nicely alongside the other therapies and patients frequently report great improvements to their symptoms.”

There is some useful information on the website about LLLT, including a video explaining how it works.

So, if pain has stopped play when it comes to your exercise regime then why not contact Robin to see if LLLT could get you back up and…well, running?

What can I do to relieve my back pain?

Google searches around back pain, relief for back pain and back pain exercises skyrocketed in 2020. Which is concerning news for me as an Osteopath.

In some ways it’s not surprising. Back pain affects up to 80% of us at some point in our lives. It’s one of the most common reasons for workplace absence and the NHS spends more than £1 billion per year on back pain related costs. Plus, there’s the challenges of the past year – the long term impact of working from home in an imperfect set up, new, different or abandoned exercise routines and the undoubted increase in stress.

So I can understand why, in the absence of the usual access to NHS services, people are turning to other sources. But Google is not the answer.

The good news about back pain

Pain of any sort can be distressing and worrying. It can lead to feelings of stress which can manifest physically as tightened muscles and thus increased pain. And so the cycle builds. But (and this is the important bit!) back pain is rarely due to any serious disease and the long-term outlook is good.

Your spine is made of solid, bony blocks reinforced by strong ligaments and muscles. It is surprisingly difficult to damage. But if strained, the surrounding muscles and ligaments can cause discomfort and pain.

Why Osteopathy for back pain relief?

In the UK, Osteopaths must be registered with the General Osteopathic Council (GOsC) to practise. They are highly trained professionals skilled in diagnosing health issues.  This includes those that may require further investigation. Osteopathy is a safe and effective way to prevent, diagnose and treat a wide range of health problems.  Including back pain.

I qualified in Osteopathic Medicine 25 years ago.  I’ve since trained in various additional complementary disciplines to extend the options I can offer to my patients:

Western Medical Acupuncture
Low Level Laser Therapy (also known as Cold Laser Therapy)
The Perrin Technique for ME/CFS
Neuro Linguistic Programming & Coaching (NLP)

At your first appointment, I take a full medical and lifestyle history to get a proper understanding of the issue that has brought you to my clinic and of you as an individual. This combined with a physical examination enables me to devise a treatment plan specific to the problems you’re experiencing.

How can an Osteopath help with back pain?

At the Robin Kiashek Clinics, I aim to relieve pain and help strengthen the body, making it less susceptible to discomfort or injury. I also try to understand the lifestyle factors which may have contributed to the onset of pain. My range of gentle and effective treatments to relieve back pain includes manual Osteopathy, Western Acupuncture and Low-Level Laser Therapy.

Through these non-invasive methods and by working closely with your lifestyle, I can help minimise or even resolve symptoms and improve your overall health.

We’ve also recently added another string to our bow. With our Home Office Ergonomics service, we review your home working arrangements and make suggestions for improvement to help minimise the impact on your physical (and emotional) wellbeing.

Relief from back pain at  home – Tips for self-help

Last August I wrote about back pain and millennials – some top tips for prevention. These are useful guidelines for us all and you can read them here.

If you are in pain, please don’t suffer in silence. Early diagnosis and treatment can help with recovery and get you back to usual activities more quickly. Osteopaths are considered essential workers.  As such, I was vaccinated against Covid-19 in January. I also undertake weekly Rapid Flow Antigen Tests to ensure I’m Covid free. I can continue to treat patients in accordance with government guidelines through lockdown. So, please do get in touch.

 

Exercise and Endorphins

As a regular (three days a week) swimmer I was extremely pleased when my local pool reopened last month.  Like many, I did my best to keep up with my exercise over lockdown and managed to cycle regularly.  But the swimming left a hole.  Which I did my best to fill with donuts!

So as soon as it was possible, I was very keen to dive back in (sorry!) to my previous – and quite rigorous – exercise regime.  And the same can be said of many others if the number of exercise related injuries I’m seeing is anything to go by.

So, it seems timely to remind you about the need to be kind to yourselves.  We’ve been through a lot this year.  And it’s not over yet.

Here’s my top tips for exercising your way to the end of 2020:

  • There’s been much talk of pivoting during this pandemic (mainly in relation to businesses I know). If you’ve had to pivot your usual exercising regime due to pool or gym closures – then please remember that a reasonable level of strength, ability or endurance in one discipline does not make you an all-rounder. Sports and activities put different requirements on your muscle groups.  You WILL need to adjust your expectations of what success looks like.  I’ve been treating a very keen and talented young swimmer who took up running when the pools closed. Unfortunately, she set her expectations too high (basing them around what she could achieve in the pool) and attacked this new discipline far too rigorously.  The result – injury.  Which may now also impact her return to swimming.
  • We don’t know what’s to come in terms of restrictions or potential lockdowns and I’m seeing this lack of certainty manifest as anxiety and stress in my patients.
    Perhaps we need to reframe our thinking around exercise and try something different? Or, for those of us with a little more time now we’re not commuting, something extra?
    Could you fit in a yoga class?  Extend that dog walk?  Or organise a game of tennis – lots of local parks have courts that are easy and affordable to book.
    The physical benefits of exercise are well documented but the positive impact it can have on our mental health is also significant.
  • For those new to exercise -well done! Maybe you’ve started a walking or running programme or bought yourself a bike. Whatever method you choose – take it slowly.  Especially if you haven’t exercised your muscles for a long time.  There are many benefits to a slow and steady approach (both in terms of effort and frequency).  You are more likely to stay committed if you don’t feel your new hobby is taking over your life.  And less likely to injure yourself.  Which would put you straight back to square one.
  • A quick word about the exercising and the great outdoors. I know that we’re heading into Winter but don’t let that put you off togging up and heading out.  As the Walker and Author, Alfred Wainwright, said: “There’s no such thing as bad weather, only unsuitable clothing.” Outside exercise doesn’t need to mean running or cycling – a good long walk can be a very sociable option and for those lucky enough to have outside space – some vigorous gardening can really burn the calories.
  • If there’s one thing we’ve all learnt this year, it’s how to interact online. There are thousands of online exercise classes available.  And many experts offering virtual training sessions.  Truly something for everyone.  But just a quick word of warning about following online workouts where there’s no interaction with the instructor.  Be mindful of form.  Especially if you’re lifting weights.  It’s easy to pick up injuries when weights are too heavy or lifted incorrectly. So, if you’re a beginner then a ‘live’ session, where the instructor can make sure you’re exercising safely is probably best.

If you are carrying a sports or exercise related injury then Osteopathy could help.

I can use a range of therapies alongside my Osteopathy to help get you back in form including Low Level Laser Therapy and Western Acupuncture.

I have two clinics – one in North London and one on Regent’s Street in Central London.  Please do get in touch to book an appointment.

 

 

 

Lower Back Pain

We’ve spoken before about the seriousness of back pain – a debilitating ailment that can strike at any time. And lower back pain is particularly common.  According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, it is the most common cause of job-related disability.

Lower back pain is often associated with the over 50s, but we’ve recently seen a rise in the number of millennials wanting help with this issue.

Millennial lifestyle

Lower back pain can, of course, be the result of an injury such as a sporting sprain or strain.  Or it can be triggered by an underlying, untreated chronic symptom/s, often very mild and transient, which has been influenced by long-term lifestyle factors.

The current cohort of 20-40-year-olds is the first true ‘digital generation.’ They make up the largest generation in the workforce in the UK.  They are also the people most likely to be found hunched over a computer/gaming screen, in the gym lifting heavy weights and – thanks to COVID-19 – now working from home at make-shift desks.

Robin Kiashek said: “Given these lifestyle factors, it’s not surprising that Millennials are increasingly suffering with lower back pain.  And in our youth we often consider ourselves invincible, so we tend to ignore warning signs such as pain and are often not sufficiently patient with our body’s need to allow time for recovery.”

How to prevent lower back pain

Prevention is clearly the best option when it comes to lower back pain.  Here’s our top tips for avoiding this painful condition:

Watch your posture

Posture is key when it comes to keeping your back in tip top condition. Avoid slumping in your chair or on the sofa and don’t hunch over your desk. Also, watch out for tech neck .  This 21st century phenomena puts unnecessary pressure on your shoulders and back and is caused by resting your chin on your chest whilst looking at a phone or computer screen.  If you work from a laptop then raise it so that the screen is at eye level.

Take a stand

Take breaks from your work. Try to get away from your screen, stand and move about every 30 minutes or so to get your back muscles into action.  I’ve talked before about the benefits of active dynamic sitting. This is where your seating allows or encourages you to move, increase your stability and strengthen your core abdominal muscles.  There are a variety of specially designed seats on the market to improve postural health and the abdominal muscles.  I use the ‘Swopper Chair’ and would highly recommend it.

Exercise, exercise, exercise

It’s so important to work out the muscles in your abdomen and back. That’s because these are the core muscles attached to the spine or pelvis that help us to stand, move and go about our daily life. Just make you do so safely.  If you are lifting weights, be sure to bend at the hips and not your back.

Try to relax

As a trained Osteopath and Naturopath with more than 25 years in the industry, I know there’s a close link between physical, mental and emotional health. Problems originating in one place can often show up as referred pain in another. Some people manifest stress in their minds, others manifest it physically and some will do both. This causes us to tighten our muscles, particularly around our shoulders and down our spine. We all unwind in different ways but my advice would be to find yours and make time for it!

Check out your sleeping situation

We spend a third of our lives sleeping.  So, it’s definitely worth spending money on a good mattress for your back. And do be aware that a divan mattress will support your mattress and back whereas slats do not.

How we can help with lower back pain

At The Robin Kiashek Clinics, we aim to relieve pain and help strengthen the body, making it less susceptible to discomfort or injury. We also try to understand the lifestyle factors which may have contributed to the onset of pain. Our range of gentle and effective treatments includes Osteopathy, Western Acupuncture and Low Level Laser Therapy.

We’ve also recently added another string to our bow. With our Home Office Ergonomics service, we review your home working arrangements and make suggestions for improvement to help minimise the impact on your physical (and emotional) wellbeing.

Get in touch

If you are dealing with lower back pain, why not call us on 020 8815 0979 or request an appointment online?

 

 

What can we do to lessen the impact of working from home

Remote working or working from home (WFH) has been on the rise for the past last few years.

And since lockdown there’s been a huge spike in the number of people swapping their perfectly set up office desks to makeshift work spaces desks in their living rooms, kitchens or even bedrooms.

According to the latest statistics released by the UK’s Office for National Statistics in April, 49.2% of adults in employment were working from home as a direct result of the social distancing measures introduced in response to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Whilst restrictions around social distancing might be easing, there’s still a huge number of people who either work remotely permanently or for the majority of the working week.

But what physical implications and emotional does WFH create?

Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI)

Whether it’s your wrists, hands, forearms, elbows, neck or shoulders – RSI has a lot to answer for. RSI is a general term use to describe muscle, nerve and tendon pain caused by repetitive movement and overuse. It can strike anyone who performs a repetitive or high intensity action for long periods without rest. It’s also exacerbated by poor posture or activities involving working in an awkward position. Like typing on a computer or using your smartphone excessively.
Symptoms of RSI include burning, aching, or shooting pain. But you might also experience stiffness, throbbing, tingling or numbness, cramp or chronically cold hands, particularly in your fingertips.

Headaches and migraines

Bad posture, increased screen time and changes in our daily routine can all trigger tension headaches. The main feature of a migraine is a headache. But other symptoms include disturbed vision, sensitivity to light, sound and smells, feeling sick and vomiting. They can last anywhere between four to 72 hours.

Neck problems

Neck pain associated with badly positioned screens and looking down – attractively double-chinned – at mobile phones is increasingly common in this tech focussed world, and even more of an issue with so many of us now working from home.
According to The Institute of Osteopathy, tight neck and upper back muscles, stiff joints, and trapped nerves are common effects of spending too long being hunched over screens, and if left untreated, can cause splintering pains through the shoulders and hands.

Emotional implications

One of my patients told me recently that she’s always referred to her husband as her nearest and dearest. But now she just calls him her nearest! And I think that many of us can probably empathise with that feeling!
Lockdown and the ongoing working from home has put many of us in much closer proximity with family than we’re used to. And that requires emotional adjustment. Plus, there can be employment and financial worries to take into account. And stress and anxiety can bring a host of physical symptoms.

What can we do to lessen the impact of working from home?

There are a variety of ways that you can lessen the impact of working from home on your physical and emotional wellbeing.

These include:
• Set the computer screen so that’s it at eye level
• Keep your feet flat on the floor and try not to cross your legs.
• Consider a wrist rest to keep your wrists straight and at the same level as your keyboard.
• Use a headset if you use the phone a lot, rather than clamping the phone between your ear and shoulder.
• Do some simple neck exercise through the day
• Drink plenty of water through the day – the discs between the vertebrae in the spine consist mainly of water so keeping hydrated will ensure they stay healthy.
• Try to take regular breaks – these are good for body and mind. Small and frequent rests are preferable to one long one

Learn about our Home Office Ergonomics service, a service designed to improve your home working arrangements

 

I recently spent a fascinating day at the Royal Society of Medicine for the 9th Annual Spinal Symposium which looked at the spine from a range of perspectives.

The spine is often the part of the body that people most readily associate with Osteopathy (although we can assist with many other issues and help you to reach your goals in mind and body).

I think it’s vital to remain up to date with current thinking and I regularly refresh my learning with CPD events such as this, where I am always interested to hear about new developments, opinions and practices.

Annual Spinal Symposium

We heard from six excellent orthodox medical consultants who covered topics including dizziness and facial pain, degenerative spinal diseases and sport and the spine. But, for me, the most interesting speaker was Rheumatologist, Dr Roger Wolman who talked about the different types and levels of pain that people experience, and then focussed on chronic pain.

This is an issue that fascinates me and Dr Wolman’s assertion that there is often a poor correlation between chronic pain and structural abnormality certainly resonated with my experiences in clinic. Pain is often a measure of distress , both physical and sometimes emotional and not necessarily injury.

Managing chronic pain

He spoke at length about managing chronic pain and the important role that we can play in educating people about it. According to Dr Wolman, even just understanding chronic pain can help to change pain levels. He also stressed the need for patients to understand the relationship between stress, anxiety, depression and pain; to know their pain triggers; and the limited role of medication in these situations.

I have written before about the approach I take at my Clinics and how I believe in treating the person and not just the symptom they present with. This ‘body-mind detective’ role – systematically locating and treating the root cause of often very complex problems – is one I greatly enjoy and I have been able to help a number of patients who have been suffering with chronic pain over long periods of time.

Review

I’ll leave you with the kind words from a patient: “Robin’s treatments have helped reduce my back and neck pain which had plagued me for years. He has taught me how to reduce re-occurrences through exercise and lifestyle change – I was very despondent before I came to see him and he continues to help me hugely; I’m very grateful.”

So, if you’ve been nursing a niggle or putting up with pain for a while then why not book an appointment?