Plunging yourself into cold water might not necessarily be on the top of your to-do list (and who can blame you?!).

But with the recent lockdowns forcing the temporary closure of indoor swimming pools, there’s been a rise in the number of people turning to open water swimming.

As shown by  recent stats, 45% of swimmers increased how much they swam outside in 2020. The same stats estimated that outdoor swimming in the UK has increased by between 1.5 and 3 times since 2019. And there’s good reason. According to a small number of studies, celebrities and athletes – cold water therapy has a myriad of health benefits.

What exactly is cold water therapy?

Cold water therapy – which can sometimes be referred to as cold hydrotherapy – is the practice of using water that’s around 15 degrees to treat health conditions or stimulate health benefits.

Despite the recent hype around the practice, cold water therapy is nothing new. It’s actually been around for a couple thousand years. But recent modifications of this practice include short and sharp cold showers, outdoor swims and cold-water immersion therapy sessions.

 

So, why the buzz?

The exact benefits of cold-water therapy are long disputed in the health industry. But according to certain enthusiasts, taking a cold water dip is the answer to many things.

On a recent episode of Gwyneth Paltrow’s The Goop Lab, the actor and entrepreneur sent a group of her employees to Lake Tahoe in Nevada to experience to popular Wim Hof method.

 

The Wim Hof method

This method is based on a combination of extreme cold-water therapy and specialised breathing techniques. It was the brainchild of Mr Wim Hof – a former athlete – who swears by this regime and raves about the many benefits it can bring.

In the episode he says: “Cold water is a great way to learn to deal with stress. If you learn how to breathe deep, you can go into the cold water and adapt. You become the alchemist of life itself.”

 

So, what exactly are the benefits of cold water therapy?

According to Mr Wim Hof, cold water therapy can:

  • Improve your circulation
  • Reduce inflammation in your body
  • Higher energy levels
  • Deepen your sleep

 

However, it’s important to note that not much research has been done to solidify these claims. But science does suggest that it can:

  • Lessen muscle soreness – a 2011 study found that cyclists who took part in intense training sessions had decreased soreness after they immersed in cold water for 10 minutes. A later 2016 study reported the same thing.
  • Ease symptoms of depression – some studies have suggested that cold open water swimming has helped to ease symptoms of depression and anxiety. In one study, a woman who had experience anxiety and depression from the age of 17 turned to open water swimming aged 24. The study confirmed that over time, her symptoms decreased significantly.
  • Cold water can boost your immune system – A handful of studies have suggested that daily doses of cold water could bolster your immune system over a period of weeks or months.

 

To take the plunge or not to take the plunge

Keen swimmer and Osteopath Robin Kiashek says: “The jury is still out on whether cold water therapy is the answer to a wide range of health problems.

 

“But as highlighted above, there are a handful of health benefits that cannot be disputed. I myself have been swimming for as long as I can remember. With indoor swimming pools now reopening, I can’t say I will be practicing my front crawl in my nearest lake – but I might try turning the shower temperature down a few notches.”

 

Robin Kiashek has more than 25 years’ experience in his field. He believes in taking a holistic approach when it comes to treating his clients. If you are suffering from a series of health issues – whether it’s headaches, aches and pains or long covid – don’t hesitate to get in touch.

 

NB: Cold water swimming should be done with guidance from a professional and consider that certain medical conditions and ages should be taken into consideration.

 

 

 

 

 

TMJ disorders

According to a survey 68% of us confirmed that our stress levels have continued to increase over the course of 2020.

And it’s no wonder. This year has tested us all.

As a trained Osteopath with more than 20 years experience in the field, I know that stress can manifest itself in the body in many different ways. More recently, I’ve seen a number of clients suffering from a (TMJD).

What is the main cause of TMJ?

TMJD or TMD is not necessarily a well-known term, but it affects around one in 10 people in the UK.

TMJ stands for temporomandibular joint. This joint connects the lower jaw to the skull (or upper jaw) in front of the ear. A TMJ disorder is a condition affecting that joint and the muscles involved in chewing. It can also importantly affect the Trigeminal nerve, which is situated next the TMJ, giving rise to facial symptoms:

It has no definitive cause but can be brought on by over-clenching of the jaw and teeth, wear and tear of the inside jaw, injury or surgery, and stress, all of which has a physiological relationship to the neck and upper back.

According to Bupa, women tend to develop jaw conditions more often than men. It can occur at any age, but most people have them when they’re between 20 and 40.

TMJD symptoms

Symptoms include:

  • Jaw pain
  • Headaches
  • Clicking, popping and grating noises when chewing or opening the mouth
  • Earache
  • Neck/shoulder pain
  • Difficulty chewing
  • Locking of the joint
  • Facial and eye symptoms (see illustration of Trigeminal nerve distribution above)

It goes without saying that these symptoms can have a significant impact on a person’s lifestyle if left untreated. So, it’s worth seeking medical advice if symptoms are severe or long lasting.

It may be possible to alleviate the symptoms of a TMJD by eating soft foods, avoiding chewing gum and nail biting. The same could be said by completing daily Rocabado exercises, taught by Robin Kiashek, which helps to alleviate TMJ stress.

But Osteopathy can also be effective in easing the pain of TMJD by understanding the factors which may be causing the TMJD. Whether they are physical factors in the patient’s upper back, neck and/or emotional factors. Dental factors should be taken into consideration.

TMJ disorder treatment testimonials

But don’t just take my word for it. I have worked with dentist David Cook, BChD, at the London Holistic Dental Centre for more than a decade. David has referred his clients suffering from TMJ to me to help alleviate the pain.

David says: “I have worked with Robin for over 15 years and his skill and dedication have been demonstrated countless times. I treat a lot of facial pain and TMD and I have found his holistic approach is of enormous benefit to my patients, those that see him can expect a smoother, faster recovery and better long-term stability.

“He is an excellent diagnostician and his knowledge and approachability make him a valued member of my clinical team. As a dentist, I am subject to major spinal strain and can also vouch for Robin’s superb support in keeping my body straight, mobile and pain-free.”

If you’re a sufferer of TMJ, or have been suffering from the symptoms associated with this disorder, please don’t hesitate to get in touch or book an appointment.

Osteopathic Clinic London

My Central London Osteopath clinic has been based in Linen Hall on Regent’s Street for 14 years.  So, I’m pleased to announce that I’ve recently moved into a much bigger, brighter and roomier clinic in the building.

Osteopath Treatments in Linen Hall

The fabulous new-look clinic provides me with additional space (particularly relevant in the current circumstances) to deliver my full range of Osteopathic treatments and allied therapies.  These include Low Level Laser Therapy and Western Acupuncture.  Also my new Bespoke Ergonomics service.  This is where I review clients’ home working set up via Zoom and provide recommendations for improvements.

COVID-19 health and safety policy

Linen Hall Osteopathic Clinic London is equidistant between Oxford and Piccadilly Circus.  The Crown Estate manages the building as part of a large UK real estate portfolio.  All profits are returned to the Treasury for the benefit of the nation. Linen Hall has a strict COVID-19 health and safety policy in place to ensure the wellbeing of its users.  This includes:

  • Signage reminding people to abide by the social distancing rules
  • Use of face masks inside lifts
  • A sign in and out system
  • Hand sanitiser stations dotted around the building
  • Extra cleaning of all common areas
  • Internal cleaning of the clinic
  • Full sanitisation and disinfection fogging throughout the week
  • Regular deep clean of touch points like buttons, light switches and door handles
  • Patients are no longer required to obtain passes at Reception upon entry but are given a paper visitor’s sticker (to attach to their lapel)

I also continue to follow enhanced health and safety protocols in the clinic to prevent the spread of coronavirus by adhering to government PPE and General Osteopathic Council guidelines.

Life in central London

If you’ve not yet ventured back into town, it’s still very quiet in Central London.  And many shops are still operating reduced opening hours.  But Regent Street pavements have been widened and there are numerous hand sanitiser stations on the street itself.

Get in touch

Robin Kiashek is a London Osteopath and Naturopath with clinics in Central London, Soho and North London.

He is registered with The General Osteopathic Council.  Also The British Naturopathic Association.

If you are suffering with any aches or pains then don’t hesitate to get in touch on 0208 815 0979.  Or you can request an appointment online.

I recently spent a fascinating day at the Royal Society of Medicine for the 9th Annual Spinal Symposium which looked at the spine from a range of perspectives.

The spine is often the part of the body that people most readily associate with Osteopathy (although we can assist with many other issues and help you to reach your goals in mind and body).

I think it’s vital to remain up to date with current thinking and I regularly refresh my learning with CPD events such as this, where I am always interested to hear about new developments, opinions and practices.

Annual Spinal Symposium

We heard from six excellent orthodox medical consultants who covered topics including dizziness and facial pain, degenerative spinal diseases and sport and the spine. But, for me, the most interesting speaker was Rheumatologist, Dr Roger Wolman who talked about the different types and levels of pain that people experience, and then focussed on chronic pain.

This is an issue that fascinates me and Dr Wolman’s assertion that there is often a poor correlation between chronic pain and structural abnormality certainly resonated with my experiences in clinic. Pain is often a measure of distress , both physical and sometimes emotional and not necessarily injury.

Managing chronic pain

He spoke at length about managing chronic pain and the important role that we can play in educating people about it. According to Dr Wolman, even just understanding chronic pain can help to change pain levels. He also stressed the need for patients to understand the relationship between stress, anxiety, depression and pain; to know their pain triggers; and the limited role of medication in these situations.

I have written before about the approach I take at my Clinics and how I believe in treating the person and not just the symptom they present with. This ‘body-mind detective’ role – systematically locating and treating the root cause of often very complex problems – is one I greatly enjoy and I have been able to help a number of patients who have been suffering with chronic pain over long periods of time.

Review

I’ll leave you with the kind words from a patient: “Robin’s treatments have helped reduce my back and neck pain which had plagued me for years. He has taught me how to reduce re-occurrences through exercise and lifestyle change – I was very despondent before I came to see him and he continues to help me hugely; I’m very grateful.”

So, if you’ve been nursing a niggle or putting up with pain for a while then why not book an appointment?

In a world where we’re often encouraged to speak up, stand out and make ourselves heard, it feels like introverts have become the poor relation to their noisier extrovert cousins.

But as we move towards a new year, I wonder whether 2020 could finally be time for introverts to have their moment?  In a quiet way of course!  My experience as an Osteopath and Naturopath has shown that there’s a close link between physical, mental and emotional health. And for us to function properly as human beings these need to be in alignment.  So, a less frenetic and outward focussed approach to life could be the way forward.  Introverts certainly have many qualities that often go uncelebrated in these noisy times:

Low maintenance

Introverts are largely independent as they’re not stimulated by or reliant on other people.  In fact, they can find people draining.   Introverts enjoy time spent alone without unwanted stimulation and use it to recharge their batteries.  So, they are less likely to let their reserves run down and retain the ability to recover quicker from setbacks. Today’s society puts a great deal of emphasis on teamwork and being a team player. But introverts often prefer to work independently, which can mean that they require less supervision at work.

Measured

An introvert’s inclination is to reflect and observe rather than react and respond.  So, whilst decisions may take a little longer, they have been properly considered and there is less likelihood of a change of heart.  All of which makes introverts good problem solvers, critical thinkers, planners and, perhaps surprisingly, often good salespeople (they know their product back to front and have considered all possible objections!)

Good friends

Introverts prefer quality relationships over quantity. They are discriminating in who they allow into their world, and they value and nurture the relationships they develop. Introverts really listen to what the other person is trying say in conversation rather than focusing on how they might interject with their own contribution.  They are often more interested in receiving information than divulging it – which makes them very good secret keepers too!

Knowledgeable

Introverts are the kings (and queens) of concentration.  They can immerse themselves in solitary activities like research or writing for extended periods of time. This hyper focus allows them to become extremely well-informed in many areas of interest.   By nature studious and lovers of information, introverts enjoy learning and discovering new things and think that knowledge is power.  But they are also happy to share that expertise with others.

Self-aware

Introverts tend to enjoy thinking about and examining things in their own minds. Including their own preferences, feelings and motivations, how others see them and how they fit into the world.  This often means they are better able to manage their emotions and are inclined to act consciously (rather than react passively).  There is strong scientific evidence that people who know themselves and how others see them are happier.

Obviously we can’t change who we are.  Although if you’re interested in labels and would like to establish whether you’re officially an introvert then there are lots of tests available online including this one from 16Personalities.  In an age when it feels almost compulsory to share our every thought and opinion with our online friends and followers however, I do think we could learn from how introverts value quiet time for recharging.  Perhaps it’s something we could aim to take with us into the new year?

 

Sciatica can strike anyone

What do football manager Thierry Henry, actress and singer Olivia Newton-John and Jean-Claude Juncker, the former President of the European Commission, all have in common? Not much on the face of it, but the fact is that all three have, at one time or other, been battling sciatica.

The former Arsenal striker went from strength to strength following a bout in 2006. Grease star Newton-John was forced to cancel several concerts two years ago while the painful condition was blamed – amidst much speculation – for the 64-year-old Juncker’s stumbles during a recent Nato summit.

What is sciatica?

The older generation will be more familiar with it as Lumbago, but Sciatica (as it’s now called) is an unpleasant and disruptive condition that can potentially afflict anyone – of all ages and levels of fitness!  It’s often confused with other types of back pain and occurs when the sciatic nerve is compressed or injured. This nerve is the largest and longest in the human body. It runs all the way from the lumbar region in the lower back, through the buttocks and down both legs to the feet. Symptoms can make themselves felt anywhere along the nerve, from the lower back, through the genital region and all the way to the feet.

Symptoms of Sciatica

Common symptoms of sciatica include:

  • Stabbing, burning or shooting pains along the sciatic nerve in the:
    • lower back, hip and/or buttock(s)
    • backs of the thighs and down the legs
    • feet and/or toes
    • genital area
  • Burning or tingling (pins and needles) in the legs and/or feet
  • Numbness and weakness in affected areas
  • All of the above made worse by prolonged sitting, standing or walking, heavy lifting and any activity with an impact on the spine (eg running)

Causes of sciatica

The vast majority of sciatica cases are caused by:

A herniated or protruding disc: Positioned between the vertebrae (bones in the spinal column) discs act as shock absorbers or cushions with the lower spinal discs taking on most of the upper body weight. Over time their hard, fibrous outer structure may develop tiny tears, usually as a result of overload or poor posture. This allows their jelly-like inner core to herniate or protrude, irritating the sciatic nerve. and often referred to as a ‘trapped nerve’.

Poor posture: Sitting incorrectly with more weight on one hip than the other can irritate or compress the sciatic nerve.

Degenerative Spinal Arthritis. Osteoarthritis in the spine can damage the cartilage (connective tissue) on the joints and discs in the neck and lower back, producing spurs of bone that press against the sciatic nerve.

Impingement of the sciatic nerve along its course:  the sciatic nerve can be affected by the pelvic joints (sacroiliac joints) or if the nerve passes through the Piriformis muscle (deep in the buttock region), where tightening of the muscle can give sciatic-type symptoms. 

Treating sciatica with Robin Kiashek

The condition may improve on its own after four to six weeks, although this largely depends on the patient’s age, medical history, lifestyle and, importantly, whether he or she heeds my advice! Try not to let it interfere with your daily activities. You can help yourself in battling sciatica via:

  • Avoiding prolonged sitting
  • Keeping moving but only if this doesn’t cause you pain
  • Using cold hydrotherapy (sitting in a cool bath or gentle swimming) to relieve pain on the lower spine
  • Avoiding high impact activities
  • Not sleeping on your front and either putting a pillow under your knees if sleeping on your back, or putting a pillow between your knees if side-lying

Does sciatica go away on its own?

If your symptoms show no sign of improving after a few days, please make an appointment at one of the Robin Kiashek Clinics. I will take a full case history and perform a clinical examination to determine the exact cause of your pain. We will then agree on a treatment plan which may also include advice on exercise, posture, pain management and how to prevent any future attacks.

To get in touch please call 020 8815 0979 or click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stretch before exercise

It’s that time of year – the clocks have gone forward, the days are longer and spring is definitely in the air. And, as people ditch winter woollies for T shirts and cotton frocks, their thoughts inevitably turn to getting toned and fit for summer. It’s time to build a healthy exercise habit!

Some will dust off their trainers and enrol in a gym (or return to the one they joined in January!). But if the prospect of pounding the treadmill or sweating your way through a spin class leaves you cold, there are many other ways to achieve your fitness goals, whatever they may be.

The benefits of regular exercise are many and proven. Think increased energy, improved immune system function, lower risk of cancer, heart disease and diabetes, reduced stress and better mood.  Not to mention toning up and looking better.

Build a healthy exercise habit

But here’s the thing about exercise: achieving any fitness goal requires consistency (coupled with healthy eating), and the motivation to continue until it becomes routine. That’s not always easy so check out our eight top tips to help you build a healthy exercise habit:

Pick an activity you enjoy

You can burn a zillion calories on the rowing machine but if (and when) boredom sets in you’ll quit. Finding an activity that grabs you may take time and research but it’s worth it. Heading into spring, you can take advantage of the lighter evenings outdoors by walking, cycling, jogging, playing tennis or kicking a ball around with your children. Or if you like dancing, why not have a go at Zumba or salsa? For more sociable and/or competitive souls, a team sport like netball or football might be just the thing. Remember, too, that your chosen sport should align with your fitness goals. Yoga or weight training won’t increase cardiovascular strength, while running doesn’t build flexibility!

Indoors vs outside?

Various studies, including one in 2011 published by Environmental Science and Technology, have highlighted the health benefits of exercising outdoors, especially in a park or green open space. These include improved mood, increased energy, a more varied workout (based on your surroundings), and all for free!

Start exercising gently

If you haven’t exercised for some time (or at all), ease yourself into it by doing a few minutes at a time, gradually increasing the time and the intensity. Always warm up beforehand and stretch afterwards to avoid injury.

Schedule in exercise

Turning your chosen activity into a habit is all about regularity. Choose a convenient time and diarise the session just as you would a work meeting. Do allow enough time too. Some sports are more time-consuming, especially when factoring in travelling, showering and changing. If you lack time, consider exercising at home. You can do it at any time and you’ll never have to wait for the elliptical trainer – unless your exercise buddy (see below) or other half is hogging it.

Buddy up

Several studies have shown that people are more likely to stick with an activity if they receive support from close friends and family* or if they partner up with a friend or family member. That’s as true for Zumba or team sports as it is for ‘solitary’ activities such as swimming, cycling, weight training or exercising at home. Buddies share your highs and lows, helping to motivate you to achieve your goals. You’re less likely to skip a workout if it means you’re letting your exercise partner or the team down. There are other benefits, too. A 2011 study published in in the American Journal of Health Behavior showed that exercising with a buddy increases feelings of energy, enabling you to keep going for longer, compared with exercising alone. The same study found that it elevates mood and reduces stress.

Give self-control a helping hand

Relying on self-control doesn’t work. Barbara Brehm, author of Successful Fitness Motivation Strategies, says that “self-control is a limited resource and that the stress we experience during the day gradually erodes our willpower to exercise”. This is why morning exercisers are more likely to stick to a workout routine. By the end of the day we don’t have enough self-control to exercise, especially if it’s raining or there’s something good on TV. So remove barriers to making the ‘right’ decision to exercise by… picking something you enjoy, diarising it, buddying up and so on.

Consider safety

Some activities aggravate existing injuries or illnesses so seek advice from a doctor (if you have high blood pressure, for example) or an osteopath. With hip, knee or ankle problems avoid running or jumping and opt for lower-impact activities. So try rowing, walking/hill walking, stepping, cycling, swimming or weight training instead. Don’t be fooled by the term ‘low impact’ – you’ll still work hard and burn calories! With an exercise class, talk to the instructor beforehand. They will advise about avoiding specific moves, possibly suggesting alternatives.

Be Patient

Sometimes it takes time to achieve your goals. You can’t build a healthy exercise habit overnight. It’s normal for motivation to dip when you get sore or don’t see quick results. Don’t judge yourself harshly. Simply acknowledge the obstacles and use the tips outlined above to help you achieve the outcome you want and deserve.

If you’d like advice on which exercise is right for you, why not book an appointment with osteopath Robin Kiashek.

*The influence of close others’ exercise habits and perceived social support on exercise – Susan D.Darlow and Xiaomeng Xu, Psychology of Sport and Exercise, Vol 12, Issue 5, September 2011, Pages 575-578

Have you noticed how your cat and dog always have a good stretch when they wake from a nap?

Well maybe we should follow suit because when we sleep we lie in the same position for an extended period and this can lead to stiff muscles that become tight through the lack of movement.  So if we were to act like the animals and start the day with a stretch it would really help to:

 

  • Loosen and realign muscles
  • Iron out any kinks from sleeping in an odd position
  • Signal the brain that it’s time to get up and start using those muscles again
  • Get the circulation going.

And since we start the day all warm after our night under the duvet, the body is already at a temperature ideal for effective stretching.

Stretch it out

Stretching is in fact one of the best ways to keep your muscles healthy, here’s how:

  • Regular stretching strengthens muscles and increases flexibility
  • Increased flexibility in turn benefits joints
  • Both of which will give a better range of motion for day-to-day activities

In fact, stretching daily as a stand-alone activity can boost muscle and joint health, decrease the risk of day-to-day injury by improving flexibility, reduce tension and improve posture.

And while the ‘morning stretch’ so readily employed by our furry friends is a great way to wake up and get going, a more targeted stretching routine for specific parts of the body will have the greatest benefit to you muscle and joints.

Boost your energy

Stretching at work can also help to avoid repetitive strain injuries that are caused by many office-based duties, as well as boost your energy! Simple overhead arm stretches or leg raises under the desk are a great way to start, but don’t be afraid to get up and do a few squats to get your circulation going too.  Here’s my five tips to get a better stretch:

 

  1. Make sure to stretch evenly on both sides of the body
  2. Hold each stretch for about 30 seconds
  3. Never bounce while you stretch
  4. Focus on the different muscle groups – shoulders, neck, calves, thighs, hips, arms and the lower back.
  5. Breathe! Exhale while going into a stretch and then hold it as you inhale.

And if you are still feeling the strain, and are starting to feel a little stiffness in your neck, arms or lower body then why not consider a course of osteopathy to aid the release of this tension and provide relief from bad posture and tight muscles?

Get in touch to find out more